Algebra 1 *Solving Equations* Unit Review Stations/Task Cards Activity

My students are finishing up their 3rd unit which is all about solving equations.  The unit includes:

  • Solving 1-step through multi-step equations.
  • Writing equations from applications and then solving
  • Special solution cases (no solution and infinite solutions)
  • Solving Absolute Value Equations
  • Writing absolute value equations from a graph
  • Writing and solving absolute value equations from a scenario
  • Ratios and proportions
  • Solving proportions
  • Percent of change problems (emphesis on working backwards to find original value or final value)
  • Literal equations

To help them review, I’ve made the following set of task cards (to be done at 11 different stations around the room), using problems from a variety of different resources.  I have my students for 2 periods each day, so we should be able to finish in one class.  If you have only one period per day, this might take you 2 periods.  OR you could give students the choice of picking any 2 problems from each station to complete.

I will have students work in groups of 4 and will give them 8 minutes per station.  If they finish early, I have an additional review assignment for them to work on in the meantime. On the back of each card is the final solution, so students can quickly check if their work is on the right track, or not.  If they’re really off and can’t find where they’ve gone wrong, I’ve also provided the fully worked out solutions for each problem at the given station (but that is only to be used if truly needed).

Click HERE to download the stations/task cards activity.

The fonts Riffic and Arcon are used, throughout.  If you plan on editing the Word Document to fit the needs of your own class, you’ll want to download those two free fonts.  Otherwise, the PDF is good to go!

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I have each station paper-clipped together.  Each station contains 4 problems that are placed inside a white half-sheet of paper that contains the fully worked out solutions.  The  white paper with full solutions are there only in case a full group of students truly get stuck. fullsizerender-16

The front of the cards have the question (and problem number).  The back side has just the answer–no hints as to how that answer was reached.  Students can collaborate together to get the right answer, if their answer didn’t initially match.  If they’re really stuck, they are allowed to use the white solutions paper for the station. fullsizerender-17

Here’s an example of the solution paper for Station 8.  It’s nothing fancy, but it does the job.  It’s meant to get a group “unstuck” if they couldn’t figure something out together.  After all, there’s only one of me and 36 of them, so extra help is sometimes good to provide. fullsizerender-18

Here’s a look at all of the questions, from each station (the problems are to be cut apart, and turn into 3″x5″ rectangles).

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Solving Literal Equations “Connect 4” Activity {Student Approved} FREE DOWNLOAD

Recently, I reached out to the MTBoS looking for fun ideas for practicing solving literal equations.  I had searched pretty thoroughly to find any pre-existing activities on the internet, but there wasn’t a lot available.  On top of that, what was there, required way more pre-existing skills (SO MUCH FACTORING!) than my Algebra 1 students currently had a month and a half into the school year.   Unfortunately, the MTBoS and I were pretty stuck. feed

Farther down in this Twitter conversation, however, it was mentioned that someone recently used BetterLesson’s lesson for teaching literal equations.  At that point I had already taught the lesson and most of my students caught onto solving them quite quickly, but I still was looking for a fun way to get a bit more practice in.  While exploring what BetterLesson had, I found this worksheet  that gave me inspiration for a game I could play with my students.  After a little bit of brain-storming, I created what I’m calling a Connect 4 Activity.  Essentially, it’s BINGO, but 4×4 instead of 5×5.

How to play: 

  • Before game: print enough game cards so each student has one, and cut apart the 16 problems.  I fold the problems in half (the problem number to the inside) and put them into a plastic bin.  (When printing from your computer, make sure it says “print double sided, flip on long-edge.”)
  • To start off the game, each student gets a game board, on which they randomly place the numbers 1-16.  Students then pull out a piece of scratch paper, where they will be doing their work.
  • The teacher brings the plastic bin containing the 16 equations around the classroom, letting a student volunteer pick a problem at random. (They LOVE getting to pick!)
  • The teacher then places the problem under the document camera (or writes it on the chalk/white-board if you’re at a low-tech school) for students to solve.
  • After all students have solved the problem, discuss the solution as a class.
  • Once all students are silent, the problem number is revealed for students to cross off on their game card. (The excitement levels usually explode at this point, hence the moments of silence in between.)
  • Repeat for as much class time as you have available, or until all 16 problems have been solved.
  • Each time a student gets 4 in a row, they bring up their card and their work for inspection (they showed their work and corrected any mistakes for each problem), and are allowed to choose a small piece of candy (Jolly Rancher, a Starburst, etc.).

Reasons why I LOVE this game:

  1. It is super easy to set up and is so adaptable for other topics.  This has probably been the lowest prep activity I have made for my students, yet it has been one of the most successful.
  2. Students felt much more confident about their skills and were able to get nearly-instant feedback about how they’re doing.
  3. Students LOVED it. The class begged me to continue letting them play the game through passing time.

Download the game here:2-8-literal-equations-connect-4-activity-page-001connect 4 problem cards for blog post picsconnect 4 problem cards for blog post pics2More Literal Equations Activities:
(Updated September 2017)
This year I wanted to find more ways to practice literal equations with my Algebra 1 students.  We teach literal equations the week before Halloween, so I wanted to make something really fun and “Halloween-y.”  I made a Carving Pumpkins activity that’s self-checking and SUPER fun!  I couldn’t wait to try it out, so I gave it to my Algebra 2 students mid-September (patience never was my virtue) since they review literal equations in their first unit.  Students though it was fun, and they also found it really comforting that it’s self-checking.  To quote a group of boys, “this is super dope, we should do this for all of the holidays!”

Students are given 12 literal equations to solve for a specific variable.  Depending on what their answer was, they “carve” color the corresponding pumpkin in a particular way. In the end, each of the pictures should end up looking the same, as far as the color and carvings go.

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I’ll be making more activities, and will update the post!

 

 

Percent of Change Scavenger Hunt Activity {Free Download}

This week in Algebra 1 we covered the topic of percent of change, which is one of the many Algebra 1 topics that is covered in middle school but gets revisited in high school.  The concept of percent of change isn’t too challenging, even when working backwards to find an original or final value, but, geesh, it can be boring.  I looked around online and couldn’t find many activities for this topic, and the ones that I could were really geared toward lower middle school grades, so I decided to make my own version that is great for an 8th-9th grade class.

There are 17 problems that are to be posted, alphabetically, around the room (get creative, though!  can you hide any?).  Students work in pairs, each student getting their own work recording sheet.  Each pair of students also gets a path recording sheet, so they can track the order of problems they’ve gone through.  Students can start at any letter, that way you don’t have 30 students starting at the same place (I normally have a 4 person limit per letter).  Whichever letter a pair of students starts at will be the first letter added to their path recording wheel. They will solve the problem at the bottom, and then look around the room at the tops of the other letters until they find the letter with their answer printed on top.  Then, they go to the new letter, record it on their path recording wheel, and solve the problem at the bottom of the page.  The process repeats until the student makes it back to the letter they began at.

You can download the PDF and editable PowerPoint version of the scavenger hunt here.  You’ll need the fonts Wellfleet and HVD Comic Sans if you want to edit the PowerPoint file.  Otherwise, the PDF is good to go!

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